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A computer called Katherine : how Katherine Johnson helped put America on the moon / written by Suzanne Slade ; illustrated by Veronica Miller Jamison.

Slade, Suzanne (author.). Miller Jamison, Veronica, (illustrator.).

Available copies

  • 18 of 26 copies available at Bibliomation. (Show)
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Rowayton Library.
Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Rowayton Library J BIO JOHNSON (Text to phone) 33625122926863 Juvenile Biography Available -

Record details

Content descriptions

Summary, etc.: Includes bibliographical references.
Target Audience Note:
Age 4-8.
Subject: Johnson, Katherine G Juvenile literature
United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Officials and employees Biography Juvenile literature
Johnson, Katherine G
United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Officials and employees
African American women mathematicians Biography Juvenile literature
Women mathematicians United States Biography Juvenile literature
Mathematicians United States Biography Juvenile literature
African American women mathematicians
Women mathematicians
Mathematicians
Women Biography
African Americans Biography
Genre: Biographies.
Picture books.

Syndetic Solutions - School Library Journal Review for ISBN Number 9780316435178
A Computer Called Katherine : How Katherine Johnson Helped Put America on the Moon
A Computer Called Katherine : How Katherine Johnson Helped Put America on the Moon
by Slade, Suzanne; Miller Jamison, Veronica (Illustrator)
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School Library Journal Review

A Computer Called Katherine : How Katherine Johnson Helped Put America on the Moon

School Library Journal


(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

K-Gr 3-Even as a child, Katherine Johnson loved numbers. She skipped through school, took a job as part of a team of number crunchers called "calculators," and helped figure out the trajectory of early space flights of the 1960s, even after machine computing became a part of the process. This retelling of Johnson's achievements focuses on her path as a black female mathematician. The book devotes a spread to the civil rights struggle, illustrating how people were divided about school integration; it also shows that many disagreed about whether women should work at jobs traditionally held by men. Jamison stresses how Johnson's talent for math broke both barriers. Covering much of the same ground as Helaine Becker's Counting on Katherine, the text is relatively straightforward and accessible even to listeners not yet ready for the inclusion of incorrect math problems, such as "25 ÷ 5 = 4," used as examples of how wrong some people's assumptions were. First-time illustrator Jamison relies on ink, watercolor, marker, and colored pencil to create spreads that emphasize math concepts. Often there's a faint background of the geometric images and equations shown on the end papers. Back matter includes author and artist notes about their personal connection to the subject, quotes from Johnson herself, and sources and credits. VERDICT Another appealing picture book biography of a successful woman; a strong choice for most collections.-Kathleen Isaacs, Children's Literature Specialist, Pasadena, MD © Copyright 2019. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Syndetic Solutions - BookList Review for ISBN Number 9780316435178
A Computer Called Katherine : How Katherine Johnson Helped Put America on the Moon
A Computer Called Katherine : How Katherine Johnson Helped Put America on the Moon
by Slade, Suzanne; Miller Jamison, Veronica (Illustrator)
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BookList Review

A Computer Called Katherine : How Katherine Johnson Helped Put America on the Moon

Booklist


From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.

Math came easy to Katherine Johnson while she was growing up. In the 1950s, when she was in her 30s, she was hired at NASA as a computer (a female mathematician who assisted the male engineers) and eventually worked her way up to the Apollo 11 project. Vignettes of Katherine's work familiar to aficionados of the 2016 film Hidden Figures depict her talent with calculations, the drama of early space travel, and the way both combined to put humans on the moon. There are a few missed opportunities just how groundbreaking Katherine's work was for the time, given her gender and race, isn't fully conveyed. Still, Slade, herself a rocket engineer, cleverly integrates topical concepts within the text, and the strong back matter includes a time line and source notes. For younger readers, the racist arguments Katherine's African American family faces are depicted as being as wrong as 5 + 5 = 12. Wide pages offer appropriate room for the engaging mixed-media illustrations (don't miss the endpapers!), which wonderfully introduce, depict, and honor this STEM heroine.--Andrew Medlar Copyright 2019 Booklist

Syndetic Solutions - Publishers Weekly Review for ISBN Number 9780316435178
A Computer Called Katherine : How Katherine Johnson Helped Put America on the Moon
A Computer Called Katherine : How Katherine Johnson Helped Put America on the Moon
by Slade, Suzanne; Miller Jamison, Veronica (Illustrator)
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Publishers Weekly Review

A Computer Called Katherine : How Katherine Johnson Helped Put America on the Moon

Publishers Weekly


(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Slade explores the life of NASA mathematician Katherine Johnson. Johnson excelled in mathematics beginning in childhood but was frustrated by the lack of opportunities available to women of her era. Her perseverance and skills led her to work at a Virginia research center, where she made complex calculations, advocated for her right to attend meetings with male engineers, and eventually joined the NASA space team. Slade writes in clear, up-tempo prose, well paired with Jamison's expressive mixed-media art, which presents Johnson as a self-assured figure in bright, jewel-toned clothing. Spreads also feature chalky mathematical computations, and the launch of Apollo 11-guided by Johnson's meticulous calculations-is presented dynamically across three panels. An uplifting portrait of a no longer so "hidden" figure. Ages 4-8. (Mar.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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